Death of the Lucky Country
Read Online
Share

Death of the Lucky Country

  • 935 Want to read
  • ·
  • 15 Currently reading

Published by Penguin Books Australia Ltd .
Written in English


Book details:

The Physical Object
Number of Pages115
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7357260M
ISBN 100140700498
ISBN 109780140700497

Download Death of the Lucky Country

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

Death of the lucky country. [Donald Horne] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for Contacts Search for a Library. Create Book: All Authors / Contributors: Donald Horne. Find more information about: ISBN: OCLC Number: Description.   Death of the Lucky Country by Donald Horne, , available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide/5(18). Death of the lucky country / Donald Horne Penguin Books Australia Ringwood, Vic Australian/Harvard Citation. Horne, Donald. , Death of the lucky country / Donald Horne Penguin Books Australia Ringwood, Vic. Wikipedia Citation. Please see Wikipedia's template documentation for further citation fields that may be required. Highly collectable book, giving a snapshot in time of the politics around in Australia. Death Of The Lucky Country, Australian Political Commentary, author Donald Horne. Condition is "Good". Sent with Australia Post Standard. Ed. Front 3 introductory pages are loose, but integrity of rest of book intact.

  Steve Irwin and Donald Horne died a year apart, during the twilight of the Howard era. The government offered Irwin’s family a state funeral in . His follow up book, “ Death of the Lucky Country ”, published in , continued this theme. If Australia was still looking to the UK for leadership in the ’s, the wry among us might note that the country clearly needed better glasses. When it was first published in The Lucky Country caused a sensation. Horne took Australian society to task for its philistinism, provincialism and dependence. The book was a wake-up call to an unimaginative nation, an indictment of a country mired in mediocrity and manacled to its past. When it was first published in The Lucky Country caused a sensation. Horne took Australian society to task for its philistinism, provincialism and dependence. The book was a wake-up call to an 4/5(1).

The phrase "The Lucky Country" is used a lot in the Australian media, rather like how the Americans use "God's Own Country" in theirs, and the first surprise was that author Donald Horne was being sarcastic. He DIDN'T think it was a good thing. Or a by: His title came from the opening words of the book’s last chapter: “Australia is a lucky country, run by second-rate people who share its luck.”. In his sequel, Death of the Lucky Country, Horne clarified his meaning regarding Australia’s “luck.”. He had not meant that .   Never before has a book title slipped so quickly into the national language, although many missed the irony. The final chapter begins, 'Australia is a lucky country . Only Donald Horne experts would remember Ideas for a Nation; The Lucky Country is still in print. And now, more than a decade after Donald Horne’s death, his most famous book takes its place in a selection of pieces from this most intelligent and organic of Australian writers.